Sibal manages to sell 'India story' | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Sibal manages to sell 'India story'

A group of students and teachers from Stanford University met human resource development minister Kapil Sibal last week and picked his brains on education in India.

delhi Updated: Dec 20, 2010 01:04 IST

A group of students and teachers from Stanford University met human resource development minister Kapil Sibal last week and picked his brains on education in India. The students were excited to learn that Sibal was a product of a top Ivy League university —Harvard Law School. More importantly, the students also found out how India, one of the world's fastest growing economies, could offer them interesting short- and long-term employment opportunities at a time when the American economy is struggling. Sibal may have just sold them the 'India story'.

Public sector AI becomes 'Pvt' limited

Air India's new chief operating officer Gustav Baldauf and chief of training Stefan Sukumar pulled off the impossible recently. The two set off a mild storm when they issued an order to employees which was signed COO and chief training officer of "Air India Pvt Ltd" — an error considering the PSU was recently renamed Air India Ltd. The word 'private' was later removed.

Mattoo's googly passes litmus test?

Picked by the human resource development ministry as the first vice-chancellor of Jammu central university, strategic affairs expert Amitabh Mattoo also put his hat in the ring for the post of VC of Jawaharlal Nehru University. While political pressures might have stalled his appointment to the new Jammu varsity, by applying for the JNU top job, Mattoo has managed to reaffirm both his credentials and the HRD ministry's support.

PMO trouble for RAW top job

Research & Analysis Wing boss KC Verma might not make history, and step down before his two-year term ends with January. Verma had backed Research & Analysis Service (RAS) officer Sanjiv Tripathi, on grounds that the next chief of the external intelligence agency should be an RAS officer, not an IPS officer. As the senior, Tripathi was the natural frontrunner. His supporters were just about to raise a toast to the first RAS officer in four decades to head the agency, when news came in that PM's Office was having second thoughts.

RTI activists unhappy with draft changes

Although not too happy with the government's draft amen-dments to the right to information act rules, RTI act-ivists are not really worried. They said National Advisory Council, headed by Sonia Gandhi, would need to be on board before bureaucracy can notifying the changes.