Sidewalks dug up, students jostle with cars for road space | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Sidewalks dug up, students jostle with cars for road space

The ongoing work for the Commonwealth Games has robbed yet another area — North Campus — of its pedestrian rights, reports Ritika Chopra.

delhi Updated: Apr 14, 2010 23:48 IST
Ritika Chopra

The ongoing work for the Commonwealth Games has robbed yet another area — North Campus — of its pedestrian rights.

Sidewalks here have been conspicuous by their absence for close to three months.

Students — who mostly commute within the campus on foot — are left with no option but to join the traffic on the road.

And with the work scheduled to end only in June, the approaching admission season for students applying to colleges here could prove to be more exhausting than ever.

“The pavements on either side have been dug up everywhere. Bus stands have been rendered unusable,” said said Rini Roy, student of M.A. Psychology.

“Students, parked and moving vehicles, as a result, are all on the roads,” she added.

For the last three months, the Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD) has been trying to lay new drainage pipes in North Campus.

This will be followed by renovation of sidewalks and re-laying of roads as part of its work ahead of the Commonwealth Games.

“I understand students are facing inconvenience, but this is the situation across the Capital,” said Mukherjee Nagar councilor Rajni Abbi.

“ The work will pick up pace once colleges close for summer vacations and it will get over by the end of June,” Abbi added.

But college principals are worried about the safety of students.

They say students’ safety has been given short shrift and more thought and effort has gone into the beautification work ahead of the Commonwealth Games.

“We are not against the work but it should have probably been done in a phased manner. There are absolutely no safety precautions that have been taken,” said Rajendra Prasad, principal, Ramjas College.

“The ditches and dug up pavements are not even properly visible at night,” Prasad added.

Minor or near-miss accidents, as a result, have become quite common.

“The roads are congested with vehicles and students. Minor accidents are bound to happen,” said Akanksha Prakash, a first year student of B.A. Psychology.

“Recently, my rickshaw hit another. Thankfully, I wasn’t hurt. Such incidents are obviously never reported,” she added.