Smog in national capital to get worse from next week | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 26, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Smog in national capital to get worse from next week

The air quality remained poor in the city for the third day in a row on Monday as smog enveloped the city throughout the day. Though the situation is likely to ease a bit on Tuesday, the next week could be much worse.

delhi Updated: Nov 03, 2015 00:14 IST
HT Correspondent
The Rashtrapati Bhawan gets hazy because of the smog. Delhi’s location means that its air quality is routinely affected by dust storms in Rajasthan and open burning in neighbouring states.
The Rashtrapati Bhawan gets hazy because of the smog. Delhi’s location means that its air quality is routinely affected by dust storms in Rajasthan and open burning in neighbouring states. (Saumya Khandelwal/ HT Photo)

The air quality remained poor in the city for the third day in a row on Monday as smog enveloped the city throughout the day. Though the situation is likely to ease a bit on Tuesday, the next week could be much worse.

According to the weatherman, wind patterns suggest that the condition may get better from Tuesday. Rain is also forecast over Punjab and Haryana on Tuesday and Wednesday and that may bring down the pollutant levels in the air.

The situation, however, could be worse in the coming week. According to the Punjab Pollution Control Board (PPCB) officials, the extended paddy harvesting season means that a lot of burning is yet to come.

“The current paddy harvesting is likely to take another week to conclude. It helped a lot in keeping the density of smoke in the air low this year,” said PPCB, deputy director, Charanjit Singh.

Delhi’s location means that its air quality is routinely affected by dust storms in Rajasthan and open burning in neighbouring states.

The problem of smog intensifies in winters as low temperatures coupled with high pollution levels mean a blanket of smog.

Scrub burning is banned in both the states but the ban seems to have no effect on the ground and burning continues unabated. Recently, the National Green Tribunal had also passed an order strictly banning the practice.

Punjab deputy chief minister Sukhbir Singh Badal, meanwhile, said that Punjab will become a stubble burning-free state within the coming three years.

The air pollution and smoggy weather conditions caused by stubble burning following harvesting of paddy, however, seem to have worsened over the years, as both the state government and the Punjab Pollution Control Board have failed to handle the situation.

In Delhi, the smog also made sure that higher than normal temperatures were recorded in the city.

The maximum temperature was recorded as 31.8 degrees Celsius, a degree above normal while the minimum was recorded as 17. degrees Celsius, two degrees above normal.

The air quality over the past three days has made Delhiites gasp for air, with even those stations that usually record better air quality seeing red. The primary pollutant in the air these days is Particulate Matter 10, which is caused by open burning.