Solar power to run traffic lights, save you from snarls | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Solar power to run traffic lights, save you from snarls

If all goes well, traffic police’s power bills will show a downward trend and the traffic signals at busy intersections will perform better.

delhi Updated: Jun 20, 2012 01:01 IST
Subhendu Ray

If all goes well, traffic police’s power bills will show a downward trend and the traffic signals at busy intersections will perform better.

Delhi Police has zeroed in on an ambitious project to harness solar power for its traffic signals. It will initiate this project at six new intersections which will get solar-powered signals, giving relief to thousands of motorists from perennial monsoon woes that are the norm at this time of the year.

This environment-friendly system is already in place at Dwarka Sector 21 signal, Red Fort chowk, Burari Chowk and Shastri Park Pusta for the past few months. So far, the police said, these signals have performed ‘excellently’ as they remain functional round-

the-clock, even during major power failures.

The six locations at which the police are planning to install solar signals in a few weeks

are Mukarba Chowk, ITO, Andrews Ganj, Rajouri Garden, Indraprastha Flyover and Karkari More.

The initial success of the project seems to have raised the department’s hopes to finally take the project to the next level. The project was conceptualised way back in 2002, but never saw the light of the day just like Delhi Traffic Police’s several other ‘ambitious’ projects such as the intelligent traffic system.

“We hope that this monsoon, traffic signals at 10 busy intersections will not conk off due to frequent power failure as they will run on solar power,” said Satyendra Garg, joint commissioner of police (traffic). During monsoons, many traffic signals stop working due to frequent power failure.

Delhi traffic police have conducted trials at four intersections successfully in the past few months and are now set to start work on installing the system at six more intersections. Two agencies — Caltron and CMS — that run and maintain these signals in the city are expected to get the assignment.

“We will keep a tab on the performance of these solar signals at 10 intersections during monsoon. If they perform well even during rains, we will install the system at other signals in the next phase,” Garg added.

The city has 780 signals and 390 blinkers of which 56 are now non-functional.