Special status for Sanskriti, CRPF Public School in nursery admissions | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Special status for Sanskriti, CRPF Public School in nursery admissions

Terming these two schools as those set up for specific categories such as armed forces, paramilitary forces among others, they can carry on with their reservation. HT reported on January that these schools were likely to get special status.

delhi Updated: Jan 07, 2017 23:54 IST
HT Correspondent
Delhi admissions
The Sanskriti School in Chanakyapuri (in pic), the CRPF Public School in Dwarka and minority schools built on Delhi Development Authority (DDA) land have been exempted from the new neighbourhood/distance rule.(Hindustan Times)

The Sanskriti School in Chanakyapuri, the CRPF Public School in Dwarka and minority schools built on Delhi Development Authority (DDA) land have been exempted from the new neighbourhood/distance rule.

Terming these two schools as those set up for specific categories such as armed forces, paramilitary forces among others, they can carry on with their reservation. HT reported on January that these schools were likely to get special status.

Sanskriti School reserves 60% of the seats for children of all India and central services belonging to Group A, selected through Civil Services Examination, and serving commissioned officers of Indian Army, Navy and Air Force.

Similarly, the CRPF Public School reserves 60% of the seats for the children of CRPF. It is only for the remaining open/general seats admission will be conducted on the basis of neighbourhood.

Read: Distance, siblings rules get priority in Delhi nursery admissions

The authorities at the CRPF school said they were happy with the government’s decision.

“We are happy that the government has understood the objective and purpose behind our school,” said senior official at the school.

The reason given by the government for the special status said, “It was felt that these schools have been set up and run by the societies of government servants with a view to providing good education to the wards of their personnel/officers. Since their jobs are transferable and to ensure the admission of their wards and continuity of the studies of their wards, some preference in admission of their wards in some schools seems to be justified.”

Similarly around 40 minority schools built on government land have the right to reserve seats for the students belonging to the minority concerned.