Stalemate over dividing MCD still on | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Stalemate over dividing MCD still on

It may take a few more days before the proposal to divide the Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD) into smaller units is finalised and sent to the union home ministry for approval.

delhi Updated: May 18, 2011 23:34 IST
HT Correspondent

It may take a few more days before the proposal to divide the Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD) into smaller units is finalised and sent to the union home ministry for approval.

The stalemate over the issue continues as Delhi Congress chief Jai Prakash Aggarwal and chief minister Sheila Dikshit are yet to reach a consensus on the recommendations to divide world's second-largest civic body.

Both Dikshit and Agrawal were called by senior Congress leader Ahmad Patel on Wednesday to explain their positions. Dikshit also called an emergency meeting of her cabinet colleagues and briefed them on her meeting with Patel.

While Agarwal reportedly argued that breaking up the civic body may affect the party's chances in the civic polls slated for February 2012, sources said Dikshit briefed Patel on how the division would help in better administration.

Congress general secretary and in-charge of Delhi Chaudhary Birendra Singh was also part of the discussion.

Sources said the Delhi Congress chief also argued that 95% party workers in Delhi — including municipal councillors and majority of Congress legislators — were against restructuring of the MCD.

A three-member committee — comprising Delhi revenue minister Ashok Kumar Walia, public works department minister Rajkumar Chauhan and education minister Arvinder Singh — had proposed restructuring the MCD by dividing it into five parts, increasing the number of municipal councillors from the existing 272 to 408 and reserving 50% municipal wards for women.

While Delhi Congress chief apparently has no problem in reserving 50% seats for women, division of MCD into five parts and increasing the number of municipal wards to 408 are two critical points lacking consensus.

"The party high command has asked Dikshit to come up with a suggestion that could help break the stalemate. Division of MCD into three parts, instead of five, without increasing the number of wards could be another option that she has been asked to explore," said a senior Congress leader, requesting anonymity.

Sources said Dikshit and Agarwal could meet Patel again on Thursday or Friday to take a final decision on the matter.