Stink from public loos pushes corporations to seek help from RWAs | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Stink from public loos pushes corporations to seek help from RWAs

Toilets of Delhi are raising a stink at the municipal corporations headquarters, which have run out of ways to keep them clean. The corporations have been receiving hundreds of complaints from its councillors about the public toilets, Hamari Jamatia reports.

delhi Updated: Aug 23, 2012 00:02 IST
Hamari Jamatia

Toilets of Delhi are raising a stink at the municipal corporations headquarters, which have run out of ways to keep them clean. The corporations have been receiving hundreds of complaints from its councillors about the public toilets.

Unable to take care of the 500 odd public toilets in its jurisdiction, the south corporation has finally planned to wash its hands off the job and hand them over to resident welfare associations (RWAs) and market associations for upkeep.

North Delhi, which has about 500 toilets has also decided to start a pilot project where toilets will be handed over to private players.

The corporation will choose a couple of toilets for the pilot project and give them to a contractor. Based on the results, others will be taken up.

Subhash Arya, leader of the House, south corporation, said, “We will talk with the RWAs and the market associations to see if they can take care of the toilets. The corporation will keep paying the sanitation workers but the associations will have to oversee the job being carried out in their areas.”

Arya admitted that most of the toilets in the city are in a bad shape with sanitation workers not willing to clean them.

One of the corporation's biggest failures are waterless urinals that have come up here.

The unified MCD in 2009 had announced that 1,000 such toilets would be built all over the city before the Commonwealth Games but it could manage to build 500, most of which are not in use anymore.

Toilets given to private players for maintenance are, however, being used to put up advertisements thereby generating revenue for them.

“The corporation workers do not clean urinals regularly. There is also a scarcity of labour which is forcing us to experiment with privatising them and see if there is a visible change in their maintenance,” said Mahender Nagpal, leader of the House, North Corporation.

The corporation has ordered a status report on its toilets so that a few can be chosen for its pilot project.