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Teething trouble lands in court

Sanjay Malhotra, a 44-year-old Delhi-based businessman, has moved the District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum in Shalimar Bagh, alleging he had to fight with a hospital for his medical records. Records, which were his legal right, reports Jaya Shroff Bhalla.

delhi Updated: Aug 21, 2009 01:40 IST
Jaya Shroff Bhalla

Sanjay Malhotra, a 44-year-old Delhi-based businessman, has moved the District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum in Shalimar Bagh, alleging he had to fight with a hospital for his medical records. Records, which were his legal right.

In his complaint, Malhotra says the treating doctor refused the documents relating to his 14-year-old daughter Drishti Malhotra’s treatment.

“Dissatisfied with the treatment”, Malhotra had wanted a second opinion and so the papers.

It all started with Malhotra taking Drishti for dental treatment to Saroj Hospital and Heart Institute in Rohinee.

Malhotra alleges the hospital withheld his daughter’s scans for more than a year, without his permission.

Seeking a second opinion from another specialist and the medical records are the basic rights of any patient.

The treatment began in March 2007.

“When I was not satisfied with treatment even after a year, I wanted a second opinion. But the hospital authorities got annoyed and refused to hand me a crucial X-ray, saying it was hospital’s property,” Sanjay alleges.

“The doctor lost interest in the treatment and started asking for additional charges despite having received full payment in advance.”

Sanjay says he had to seek medical director of Saroj Hospital P.K. Bhardwaj’s intervention and the dental scans were finally returned on October 31, 2008.

“They also refused to give me the refund money, when I decided to go to another doctor for further treatment.”

The hospital refutes all the allegations, calling them baseless.

“The patient had been coming at paid OPD hours and wanted free treatment. He wasn’t willing to cooperate with the hospital rules and got into a brawl,” Bhardwaj said.

The treating doctor said, “We seek patient's permission to keep the scans since the treatment lasts as long as 2-3 years, and we need to keep referring to them. As soon as the patient asked for the records we returned them.”

The matter is sub-judice and the decision is pending.