Truckers' strike enters second day | delhi | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 23, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Truckers' strike enters second day

The ongoing truckers' strike protest increased highway toll tax and duty structure on diesel entered its second day on Thursday, crippling movement of goods in various parts of the country.

delhi Updated: Jul 03, 2008 10:34 IST

The ongoing truckers' strike protest increased highway toll tax and duty structure on diesel entered its second day on Thursday, crippling movement of goods in various parts of the country.

"We are continuing the strike and we will continue till there is any favourable response from the government," AIMTC President Charan Singh Lohara told PTI today.

The apex body of truckers - All India Motor Transport Congress (AIMTC), has claimed that the strike on the first day had an overall impact of about 85 per cent in halting the movement of goods carrier.

The Transport Ministry officials, however, said the impact in the first day was much less and it was about 10 per cent to 35 per cent depending upon different areas.

AIMTC, the apex body of transporters that claims to represent nearly 4.8 million truck and two million tempo operators, is demanding roll-back of hike in toll tax, honouring of service tax agreement of 2004, removal of speed governors on highways and rationalisation of duty on diesel.

Meanwhile, separately, the Petroleum Ministry had assured yesterday that unbranded diesel would be made available to truckers at normal rates.

In his meeting with AIMTC yesterday, Transport Minister TR Baalu had said that rolling back the hike in toll tax would not be possible as the increase was affected through an act of Parliament.

On the first day, the agitators met twice the Transport Ministry officials, besides holding discussions with the Finance Ministry.

The talks, however, remained inconclusive and the truckers decided to continue the strike.

The mass protest yesterday had crippled industrial activity in many parts of the country, although transporters maintained supply of essentials like fuel.