US, China close in on carbon accord | delhi | Hindustan Times
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US, China close in on carbon accord

The first positive signal emerged from the Cancun climate summit when China agreed to international verification of its carbon emission control measures, a long-standing demand of the US.

delhi Updated: Dec 03, 2010 00:22 IST
Chetan Chauhan

The first positive signal emerged from the Cancun climate summit when China agreed to international verification of its carbon emission control measures, a long-standing demand of the US.

India, which has been toeing the Chinese line, is likely to accept international verification of its domestic actions, a contentious topic in country’s domestic politics.

“We have proposed a verification regime under United Nations,” environment minister Jairam Ramesh said on Thursday before leaving for Cancun.

Ramesh’s willingness to accept a UN-regulated verification regime at Cancun can provide additional ammunition to the Opposition, which has stalled Parliament over its demand for a Joint Parliamentary Committee probe into the 2G scam. Ramesh has already submitted a proposal for the verification regime to the UN.

The US, the world’s second largest carbon emitter, had linked its participation to any climate treaty with mandatory verification of its mitigation obligations to major emitters — India, China, Brazil and South Africa. China has promised to reduce its emission intensity for a unit of GDP by 40-45% of the 2005 level and India by 20-25%.

China had refused to accept international verification in Copenhagen but India played a vital role in making China agree to the redefined verification regime in the Copenhagen accord. The process is called measuring, reporting and verification (MRV) and India got international consultation and analysis added to MRV in the accord, thus having China as a signatory to the Copenhagen accord.

On Wednesday, China said it had no objection if the outside world verified its reports on meeting its mitigation targets.

“We have no problem with MRV,” Su Wei, China’s chief negotiator said. “Both countries (US and China) would like to promote the progress and emerge from Cancun with a deal.”

The diplomat said China had put in place a rigorous regime to measure and assess its carbon emissions. India unveiled its domestic MRV system in June, thereby preparing itself for a verification regime. “If US and China agree on MRV, then we can look for a lot of positives from Cancun,” Ramesh said.

Climate conundrum

US had linked its participation to any climate treaty with mandatory verification of its mitigation obligations to major emitters like China, IndiaChina refused to accept global verification in Copenhagen but

India played a vital role in making China agree

On Wednesday, China said it had no objection if the outside world verified its reports on meeting its mitigation targets.