Valour of Siachen jawans now in a comic strip | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Valour of Siachen jawans now in a comic strip

Siachen, the world's highest battlefield, has witnessed one of the fiercest conflicts between India and Pakistan and a comic book now depicts these battles and the valour of our jawans. Sidhartha Roy reports.

delhi Updated: Aug 16, 2012 00:34 IST
Sidhartha Roy

Situated at almost 20,000 feet above sea level with temperature touching minus 40 degrees, the Siachen Glacier in Himalayas is guarded by Indian Army jawans despite the inhospitable terrain. Siachen, the world's highest battlefield, has witnessed one of the fiercest conflicts between India and Pakistan and a comic book now depicts these battles and the valour of our jawans.

'Siachen: The cold war', a beautifully brought out 48-pages comic book, is the labour of love of 30-year-old Rishi Kumar, a graduate from Delhi College of Fine Arts. Kumar has researched the subject, scripted and illustrated the book.

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The comic book, with its clean panels and lavishly-coloured illustrations, follows the battles fought by the Indian Army in the area since 1949 to capture the Siachen Glacier in 1984 after Operation Meghdoot. Kumar plans to bring out a sequel next month.

It was at the release of another book, 'Param Vir: Our Heroes in Battle' by Major General (Retd.) Ian Cardozo that Kumar conceived the idea. "I have grown up reading the commando series of comic books depicting British and American war heroes. There are not many inspiring comic books about our own war heroes," he said.

Writing about the battles, Kumar had to mainly depend on open sources such as newspaper clippings and the Internet. He, however, received a lot of support and advice from Major General Cardozo.

To follow his passion, Kumar left his job with an advertising agency and plunged full time into researching the subject. Once the dummy book was ready, he showed it to many publishers but no one was willing to publish it. Kumar then decided to publish the comic book himself and started AAN comics and got 1,000 copies of the comic book printed by spending money out of his own savings.