Voices rise against Amarnath killings, people in Delhi say Not in My Name | delhi news | Hindustan Times
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Voices rise against Amarnath killings, people in Delhi say Not in My Name

Away from the politicking in the aftermath of the heinous terror attack on pilgrims, Zaheeruddin was among those who came out to mourn the dead. Five people from Gujarat and two from Maharashtra were killed when terrorists attacked a bus at Anantnag in Kashmir.

delhi Updated: Jul 11, 2017 22:52 IST
Niha Masih and Ritam Halder
People gathered at Jantar Mantar on Tuesday to condemn the killing of seven Amarnath pilgrims.
People gathered at Jantar Mantar on Tuesday to condemn the killing of seven Amarnath pilgrims.(Vipin Kumar/HT Photo)

Braving the rain and interrupted by the bumper-to-bumper traffic, some managed to make it to Jantar Mantar on Tuesday evening to protest the killing of Amarnath pilgrims.

“Ek Hindu jo Kashmir ja raha ho use bhi dahshat, ek Musalman kahin aur jaa raha ho use bhi dahshat (A Hindu on way to Kashmir is fearful, a Muslim somewhere else feels the same fear). This is a cowardly attack,” said 40-year-old, Zaheeruddin standing with a ‘Hatred will not win’ poster at Jantar Mantar. “I dream of an India where no one is insecure — day or night,” he said.

Away from the politicking in the aftermath of the heinous terror attack on pilgrims, Zaheeruddin was among those who came out to mourn the dead. Five people from Gujarat and two from Maharashtra were killed when terrorists attacked a bus at Anantnag in Kashmir.

The call for the protest came from the Not in My Name campaign, which organised citizen-led protests against the spate of mob lynchings in the country. Condemning the killings unequivocally, the group posted on Facebook that they are “against political violence no matter who the perpetrator”.

Some were angry at the government for failing to protect its citizens, some were fearful of the direction in which the country was headed but most pervasive was the sense of sorrow and grief at the loss of innocent lives.

Prakhar Kumar, 22, a student of Jamia Millia Islamia, had come from Tughlakabad to join the protest as a volunteer. “I came for the June 28 protest also. It is important for us as citizens to come together to raise our voices and do our bit,” he said.

There was a social media outcry from a section against the movement dismissing it as liberal agenda, which only speaks for minorities.

Film-maker Saba Dewan, one of the organisers, told HT that it was the participation of the ordinary people that mattered. “We don’t respond to those with a political agenda of bigotry and hatred. We stand for secular values and justice and that is why we come out on the streets every time innocent humans are killed.”

Utkarsh Kumar, 25, and Santosh Goswami, 26, came from Noida. “Busy the, tab bhi aaye (We were busy sill we came) due to the nature of the incident. There may not be any tangible benefit of the protest but it’s a message,” said Utkarsh who runs his own business. “Liberals are not advancing left or right agenda but endorsing humanity.”

“It bothers me that the majority brands us liberals for speaking for minorities. We are against each and every killing,” said Goswami.

Earlier in the evening, a separate group under the banner of I Stand with India, unfurled a 180-feet national flag at Jantar Mantar, raising slogans of Bharat Mata ki Jai and Pakistan Murdabad.