Walia blames low sex ratio on neighbours | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Walia blames low sex ratio on neighbours

The Delhi government on Monday blamed the lack of medical infrastructure in neighbouring states for the skewed sex ratio and dwindling infant mortality rate in the Capital.

delhi Updated: Jan 24, 2012 01:13 IST
HT Correspondent

The Delhi government on Monday blamed the lack of medical infrastructure in neighbouring states for the skewed sex ratio and dwindling infant mortality rate in the Capital.

Talking to reporters, women and child welfare minister Kiran Walia said poor medical facilities in neighbouring states forced pregnant women to come to Delhi for delivery.

"When a baby dies in a Delhi hospital during or after the delivery, it reflects on the statistics of Delhi," Walia said.http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/HTEditImages/Images/24_01_pg2b.jpg

Walia’s statement came a day after chief minister Sheila Dikshit blamed the migration and criss-crossing of people through the city for the police’s inability to check criminals.

“This has increased criminal activities and criminals are not being caught because of this,” Dikshit had said.

Walia said 30% to 35% patients in Delhi hospitals, especially the ones close to the state borders, came from villages and towns of neighbouring states.

“While we ensure that pregnant women in Delhi follow the routine immunisation programme and get nutritious food, we are not very sure of the same in neighbouring states,” Walia said.

Against the national average of 914 girls for 1,000 boys in 2011, Delhi’s sex ratio comes to just 866 girls per 1,000 boys.

The infant mortality rate in Delhi has also registered an increase of 22.47 per thousand live births in 2010 to 18.96 in 2009.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh had also written a letter to Sheila Dikshit in September 2011 expressing concern over the city’s poor child sex ratio.

Expressing concern over the drop in the sex ratio, Walia, however, also cited the general preference for boys among a section in the society as another reason for the skewed ratio.

“The skewed sex ratio is a matter of concern for all of us. An adverse sex ratio can be a cause for serious socio-economic problems. We are bringing out various schemes to improve the sex ratio,” said Walia.

Walia said that the government had launched a week-long programme on January 18 to spread awareness on protecting the girl child.

The awareness programme is being implemented with the help of 10,560 anganwadi centres across the city.