1.5-km-long cable stolen from inside IGI airport | delhi | Hindustan Times
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1.5-km-long cable stolen from inside IGI airport

delhi Updated: Feb 01, 2010 23:55 IST
Karan Choudhury
Karan Choudhury
Hindustan Times
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Despite being armed to the teeth, 3,000 Central Industrial Security Force personnel and another 150 Delhi police personnel providing round-the-clock security could not stop a few petty thieves from stealing a 1.5 km-long cable from inside the high-security Indira Gandhi International Airport.

The theft came to light after a complaint was lodged by one of the contractors working for Delhi International Airport Limited (DIAL).

All this, when the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) had sent out two nationwide hijack alerts to all the airports. On January 28, a hijack alert was issued after the MHA got a tip-off that a plane would be hijacked and then blown up. The thieves managed to get away with the cable despite the hiked security at the airport before the 60th Republic Day. The incident was reported on January 20.

“A case was registered on the basis of a complaint given to us by the contractor. We are investigating the matter. The exact purpose for which the wire is used is still not known,” O.P. Mishra, Deputy Commissioner of Police (IGIA), said.

According to senior airport officials, the cable had been recently brought in by the contractor and was supposed to be used for wiring. The police said that in the complaint it was not specifically mentioned from which part of the airport the theft took place.

“The wire belonged to a contractor. It was to be taken to the upcoming Terminal-3 construction site of the IGI Airport. The security there was not able to detect the theft of such a huge amount of cable that is vital in the wiring process. Every part of the airport is kept under strict vigil and such a theft is a major security breech,” said a senior airport official. The new terminal is due to be completed by March 2010. DIAL officials refused to comment.