B-schools get breather, but key concerns still persist | delhi | Hindustan Times
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B-schools get breather, but key concerns still persist

The All India Council for Technical Education on Friday extended an olive branch to private B-schools battling recently introduced controversial norms, by offering them a minor concession. But major demands of the B-schools — for which they have approached the Supreme Court — remain unaddressed. Charu Sudan Kasturireports.

delhi Updated: Mar 12, 2011 00:02 IST
Charu Sudan Kasturi

The All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) on Friday extended an olive branch to private B-schools battling recently introduced controversial norms, by offering them a minor concession. But major demands of the B-schools — for which they have approached the Supreme Court — remain unaddressed

India's apex technical education regulator has decided that B-schools can choose from the Common Admission Test (CAT), the Management Aptitude Test (MAT) or state government conducted tests to pick students. B-schools can also select students using a combination of these tests.

The state governments, which will manage the admission process, will then offer seats to students in Post Graduate Diploma in Management (PGDM) institutions based on the test combination picked by the B-school and rankings of students in that test.

Under a controversial December 30, 2010 AICTE notification, the states were empowered to decide for all institutions in their territory whether to admit students through the CAT, MAT or a state government test.

But the AICTE decision — taken at a meeting of the council here — does not address a number of major concerns raised by the B-schools. The institutions have approached the Supreme Court over these concerns.

Empowering the states to manage the admission process, — including deciding which student is finally admitted to which institute — is an attempt at taking away their autonomy, the institutes are arguing.

They feel that this could lead to greater red-tapism and corruption.