Capital waste of office hours on the Net | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Capital waste of office hours on the Net

A survey finds corporate employees in Delhi spend more time in office chatting online or surfing the Internet for personal stuff than counterparts in four other Indian cities, reports Ruchi Hajela.

delhi Updated: Jan 26, 2008 03:49 IST
Ruchi Hajela

Corporate employees in Delhi spend more time in office chatting online or surfing the Internet for personal stuff than counterparts in four other Indian cities, a survey of network managers in key business sectors reveals.

IT managers of about 91 Delhi-based firms believe that employees spend around 12.35 hours of their five-day work schedule going out of work bounds, says the survey.

Workers in Mumbai, Chennai and Hyderabad spend only 5 hours a week on sundry stuff, while those in Bangalore spend 7.5 hours, the survey says.

Market researcher Nielsen conducted the survey for Websense, a company that specialises in security and productivity-related products and services on the Net.

But Delhi’s workers differ with their IT managers. They say they spend an hour or less on surfing that is not related to work.

The biggest culprits are employees of the IT and IT-enabled service firms, who spend nearly 3.5 hours of their workdays chatting, surfing, social networking and engaging in other activities.

Ironically, about 72 per cent of the Delhi firms surveyed have an Internet usage policy but no way of enforcing it.

“Internet has been an enabler at the workplace but employee behaviour regarding internet usage is a key challenge for companies,” Manish Bansal, marketing manager for South-East Asia at Websense, told the Hindustan Times.

The “State of Security India Survey” includes inputs from about 900 people (both IT managers and employees) across 452 organisations across Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Hyderabad and Bangalore. The survey covered sectors including financial services, IT/ITES, manufacturing and pharmaceuticals, with the rest clubbed into a single category.