Child panel draws up a stiff code for teachers | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Child panel draws up a stiff code for teachers

Calling a child names on the basis of skin colour, body structure, gender, religion and caste by teachers could very soon invite disciplinary action, and in extreme cases, sacking. HT reports. Defining abuse

delhi Updated: Feb 13, 2012 00:59 IST
Moushumi Das Gupta

Calling a child names on the basis of skin colour, body structure, gender, religion and caste by teachers could very soon invite disciplinary action, and in extreme cases, sacking.

This will happen if new guidelines to define discriminatory treatment, mental and physical harassment of schoolchildren being drawn up by the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) are accepted by the human resource development ministry. Once approved, these will be sent to states for implementation. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/HTEditImages/Images/13_02_pg-01b.jpg

At present, there is no statutory definition of corporal punishment

The Right to Education Act, 2009 merely says, "No child shall be subjected to physical punishment or mental harassment".

The tough new guidelines began to be formulated after 13-year-old Kolkata student Rouvanjit Rawla committed suicide after being caned in school in February 2010. "The guidelines look at the psychological aspects of corporal punishment on children. For the first time, we are elaborating on what actually comprises a discriminatory act. We will submit the guidelines to the HRD ministry shortly," said Shanta Sinha, chairperson, NCPCR.

The move has evoked mixed reactions. "Such strict regulations are uncalled for and will bring fissures in the teacher-student relationship," said VK William, principal of Mount Carmel School, Anand Niketan.

But RK Sharma, principal of Ahlcon Public School, Mayur Vihar-I welcomed the step.

"Initially, teachers will find the recommendations very harsh. But they have to realise that children today are much more sensitive. To deal with them, teachers will have to change their attitude and treat a child with dignity."