Courts to fix matches on weekends | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Courts to fix matches on weekends

delhi Updated: Feb 28, 2009 23:59 IST
Sumit Saxena

Marriage not working out? Caught in a bitter tussle with the no-longer ‘better’ half? And you want to settle the dispute without breaking the bank?

You could check out the free ‘matrimonial lok adalats’ (public hearings) being started by Delhi Legal Services Authority (DLSA) today.

A separate matrimonial court in each one of the Capital’s five district court complexes would hear cases on the first and third Sundays of every month.

The parties in dispute may appear in person or seek legal support to expedite their cases. “It is for the first time in Delhi that continuous matrimonial courts are functional. These courts would work as an alternate forum to get speedy justice,” said Sanjay Sharma, Project Officer, DLSA.

As a special feature, both husband and wife can request the trial courts to refer their pending cases to the matrimonial lok adalat for speedy disposal. The parties are also free to approach DLSA committees set up in every district court, and request them to get their respective cases transferred from district courts to matrimonial courts.

The matrimonial courts will become functional from today and operate from 11am to 4 pm. These courts would decide cases on the basis of mutual agreement.

The courts would be presided over by an Additional District Judge and an Additional Sessions Judge.

Litigants’ queries would be entertained and the court proceedings would be done free of cost. Counters would be set up in every district court to guide litigants, and the entire set up would focus on preventing estranged couples from getting into legal wrangles.

“The matters decided by Lok Adalats will be final and binding. And no appeal lies against such orders,” said Sharma.

The courts would focus on resolving the 5,426 cases under Domestic Violence Act and more than 7,500 cases pending under Maintenance Act.