Delhi albino family awaits Guinness fame | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi albino family awaits Guinness fame

delhi Updated: Mar 08, 2012 02:12 IST
HT Correspondent
Guinness World Records

Rose-Durai-with-his-wife-Mani-and-daughters-Deepa-in-black-and-Pooja-in-orange-at-their-house-in-Delhi--jasjeet-plaha-ht-photo

They are taunted as ‘angrez’ and ‘firangi’ by neighbours in the downtrodden JJ Colony near Delhi’s Kanhaiya Nagar. But if the future smiles, Rose Durai Pullan’s family will soon have a shot at fame — in the Guinness World Records, as the world’s biggest albino family.

Pullan, 50, his wife Mani, 45, and their three daughters and three sons are praying to make it to the Guinness list, but until last week they didn’t even know about its existence.

“Some foreign people visited and told us the Guinness is a great honour,” says Deepa, Pullan’s 20-year-old daughter.

The current record is held by a family of six living in the US and Canada.

In their comparison probably, Pullan lives a life far ordinary – a one-room dingy house and little money.

“It’s tough being an albino. I could never find a job, so I sell eggs, but that’s not enough to meet the needs of a large family,” he says.
The family of eight has pale white skin, white hair and cannot see clearly under the sun.

Their eyesight is so poor that two of Pullan’s sons Vijay, 25, and Shankar, 24, went to a school for the blind. They finished graduation but are without jobs. The youngest, Ram Kishan, 17, is in school.

Deepa believes she has the looks to make it to the movies. Her younger sister Puja, 14, left school when her classmates' taunts got too much.
"None of my relatives back home in Tamil Nadu suffer from albinism. We are helpless before God's will. People mistake us to be foreigners, which makes me feel odd," says Pullan.

His neighbour Punam Rajput seconds, "We have got used to seeing them, but strangers often ridicule them. They are simple people but life's not easy for them."
The Pullans have made it to several international publications, such as The Daily Mail and The Sun. Will it be the Guinness next?