Delhi doctors stitch back Iraqi groom’s foot | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi doctors stitch back Iraqi groom’s foot

delhi Updated: Dec 05, 2010 23:02 IST
Rhythma Kaul
Rhythma Kaul
Hindustan Times
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It was a crippling blow. On September 17, hours before Riyadh N Abed (34) was ready to exchange his wedding vows, he met with a serious accident that threatened to leave him wheelchair-bound for life.

A 1000-kg iron consignment had crushed Abed’s left foot in a warehouse in Baghdad, Iraq, where he works as a supervisor. It took nearly four hours to pull him out of the iron pile and take him to a hospital. He was shell-shocked when doctors told him that his foot would be amputated.

“I went numb with pain and shock,” says Abed, now recuperating at the Fortis Hospital in Vasant Kunj.

Seeing little hope for recovery in Baghdad, Abed was brought to India and admitted at the Fortis Hospital for a reconstructive surgery on October 27.

“He was brought to us with a crushed foot with multiple fractures and infection,” says Dr Rashmi Taneja, senior consultant, plastic and cosmetic surgery, Fortis, who was a part of the six-member team that operated upon him.

It took the six-member team around 10 hours to reconstruct the damaged foot, using a large muscle graft from Abed’s upper back to cover the exposed portions and two blood vessels to restart the blood flow.

“He will have problems moving his toe because he has lost a significant portion of muscles and tendons. But he will be able to walk normally,” says Dr Mandeep Singh, associate consultant, plastic and cosmetic surgery, Fortis.

As Abed gets ready to go home, his fiancée back home is more excited to receive him and complete the wedding vows.

“That poor girl has been calling me everyday since we landed in India. She wants to know when will we be back. Even he (Abed) is no less excited. In fact, they seemed so eager to be with each other that I had a mind of bringing her to India and get them married here,” says Nathud Abed, 58, Abed’s doting father.

And what could be better than a wedding in spring? “It’s a romantic season,” blushes Abed.