Delhi gets first standalone cancer daycare centre | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Delhi gets first standalone cancer daycare centre

delhi Updated: Jun 07, 2016 19:37 IST
HT Correspondent
cancer care

The Max Institute of Cancer Care–Daycare at Lajpat Nagar. More standalone clinics are being planned to help meet the growing demand for treatment of cancer, new cases of which are projected to touch 1.5 million in India by 2020.

Delhi is getting its first standalone cancer daycare centre in Lajpat Nagar for people who need chemotherapy and supportive therapies other than radiation to beat back the disease that is newly diagnosed in more than one million people in India each year.

The Max Institute of Cancer Care–Daycare at Lajpat Nagar will be headed by Dr Pramod Kumar Julka, former dean and professor of oncology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences. The insurance cover for the treatments given here will be the same as for treatments given at hospitals.

More standalone clinics are being planned to help meet the growing demand for treatment of cancer, new cases of which are projected to touch 1.5 million in India by 2020.

New breast cancer cases alone are projected to cross 100,000 in India by 2020.

“Cancer treatment is one of our focus areas and this is the first of many daycares to be launched in the next few years to ensure people are never far from a medical centre,” said Rajit Mehta, MD & CEO, Max Healthcare.

Cancer patients, as well as cancer survivors, need close follow-ups for years after diagnosis. “About 70% cancer patients need chemotherapy, 40-45% need radiation and another 70% need some adjunct therapy, such as immunotherapy, but only half the demand is met in India,” said Dr Harit Chaturvedi, chairman, Max Institute of Cancer Care.

Read: Cancer drug prices highest in US, treatment least affordable in India: study

Apart from follow-up out-patient (OPD) consultations, the 15-bed clinic will treat up to 30 patients a day. “Providing clinical care outside the hospital will also lower the risk of immuno-compromised (low immunity) cancer patients from getting exposed to other patients with infectious diseases getting treated at the hospital,” said Mehta.

Increasingly the world over, there is growing focus on providing treatment and care for chronic conditions such as pain management, diabetes, lung diseases and, among others, being treated in clinics situated outside a hospital.

“The clinic makes it possible for new cancer therapies to be delivered in a controlled and safe clinical environment outside the hospital,” said DR Chaturvedi. Radiation therapy will continue to be given in hospital. “The ambiance is customised to disassociate patients from a hospitals to boost recovery,” he said.