Didn't suggest changes to draft report: AG's defence | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Didn't suggest changes to draft report: AG's defence

Attorney General GE Vahanvati on Wednesday defended his position in the on-going controversy over alleged interference by him in the CBI probe on the coalgate scam. Bhadra Sinha reports. 11 FIRs so far

delhi Updated: May 09, 2013 01:52 IST
Bhadra Sinha

Attorney General GE Vahanvati on Wednesday defended his position in the on-going controversy over alleged interference by him in the CBI probe on the coalgate scam.

The top law officer of the government vehemently denied having seen or having suggested changes in the agency's draft report that was submitted in a sealed cover to the Supreme Court on March 8.

In his affidavit, filed on May 6 CBI director Ranjit Sinha had claimed his officers had met Vahanvati who suggested certain changes in the draft report on March 6.

Vahanvati had even attended the meeting between the law minister, Sinha and then additional solicitor general Hiren Rawal, the affidavit stated.

It, however, could not pin-point the changes suggested by Vahanvati.

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Vahanvati however, came out all guns blazing. Defending himself in a packed courtroom he denied having called for the meeting held on March 6th morning.

"It was the law minister who called for it," he told a bench headed by justice RM Lodha.

"You may not have been wrong but at the same time you should have explained everything," Justice Lodha told Vahanvati.

On CBI officers visiting him at his residential office on the same evening, the AG claimed they came of their own volition.

"The team brought over a draft copy and asked me to have a glance at it," Vahanvati added.

"People have lost sight of the fact that I am not a political executive. Even in the past I have never kept copies of status reports despite being CBI counsel," the AG said.

He strongly objected to advocates making statements against him on television discussions.

"We (government lawyers) are damned because we don't speak outside and address the court since we respect it," he said.