DU’s fourth cut-off list has little to offer students | delhi | Hindustan Times
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DU’s fourth cut-off list has little to offer students

delhi Updated: Jul 01, 2011 22:58 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

The fourth cut-off list of the Delhi University, which came out on Friday, did not bring much relief to students who were hoping to get into DU.

Most courses across colleges have filled all seats and are closed for admissions. The only courses where students have a good option are BA (programme), Sanskrit (honours) and English (honours) through CATE.

While the dip in the cut off for BA (programme) was between 5% and 2%, the same in Sanskrit was between 6% and 1%. The highest dip of 6% was seen at Hindu College for Sanskrit. For English, six DU colleges still have seats and the dip in the latest list was between 2% and 5%.

Sought-after courses such as B.Com, B.Com (honours) and Economics (honours) are also open in some colleges but saw just a nominal dip. B.Com (programme) is still open in nine colleges including Kirori Mal, where a dip of 0.25% is seen.

B.Com (honours) is still open in five colleges including Hans Raj College where the cut-off has come down by 0.25% and is now between 95.5% and 97.5%.

"We were forced to bring down the cut off as we were left with around 10 vacant seats. Though we know that we will end up over admitting students, we are ready to bear the burden," said VK Kwatra, principal, Hans Raj College.

Economics (honours) is open in five colleges including Sri Venkateswara and Ramjas. While a dip of 0.5% is seen in the cut-off at Venkateswara, admissions in Ramjas opened again in the fourth list.

Sciences
Options for students wanting to study science in the university will be disappointed by in large as admission to most courses was closed. B.Sc Physical Sciences was open in four colleges and a dip of around 1% was seen. In Hans Raj College, courses such as physics, anthropology and electronics was open.