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Free lessons on Internet on bomb making

delhi Updated: Sep 18, 2008 11:34 IST
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As security officials scramble to find clues to contain terror activities in India, scores of websites are teaching how to make bombs from hand grenades to pipe bombs all for free, say experts.

From descriptive videos that go on from two minutes to 30, to scientific programmes to explanatory texts on how to make bombs, all this and a lot more is available in cyber space.

One website mentions that hand grenade can be made from iron pipes and plastic explosives; plus, propellant from small arms or shot gun ammunition can be used for deadly attacks. The website, while giving the due procedure to make bombs, advocates the use of various lengths of fuse wires to detonate a bomb. It describes the length and diameter of iron rods required and easily available chemicals.

Another website gives a two-minute video show where a young boy demonstrates how to make bombs in five steps.

Again another site has a menu showing what you need to purchase from the nearby market to give final touches to a sinister design.

It has given a list of chemicals and other materials like potassium chlorate, sodium bicarbonate, ammonium nitrate, tiny iron balls, screws and shrapnel to make the explosive more lethal.

"The virtual world is so vast that it is almost impossible to curb such websites. When people are motivated to kill others no one can stop them. These are not good human beings like you and me," said Sankaran Nampoothiri, an expert on cyber security.

"There are over one billion blogs and three billion websites. How will you monitor them? Terrorists and other anti-social elements always have a back-up to propagate such deadly things," Nampoothiri told IANS from Chennai.

Senior Delhi Police officials said it is almost impossible to control the mushrooming websites which spread hatred, fear, and panic.

"If you block one site, these people can open some other. You can put a gag on a credible organisation, but it's nearly impossible to do so on every such site," said a police official.

"We cannot do anything, but it's up to the IT ministry to take action against such websites," said the official requesting anonymity.

"I believe such websites are a threat to mankind. While Internet is doing a lot of good work, this is the flip side to it. Fanatics are making use of it for wrong reasons," said Subhra Roy, a social activist, who was fortunate enough to leave Barakhamba crossing in New Delhi's downtown Connaught Place minutes before a blast took place on Saturday.

"I was standing very close to the blast spot but was fortunate to leave the place minutes before. It's shocking," Roy added.

On Saturday evening, five synchronized terror blasts in busy market places shook the national capital, killing at least 23 people and injuring nearly 100.