Head constable loses job over Rs 200 bribe | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Head constable loses job over Rs 200 bribe

delhi Updated: Jan 29, 2012 00:47 IST
Harish V Nair
Harish V Nair
Hindustan Times
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The fate of a Delhi Police head constable, who had demanded bribe from a sub-inspector for not wearing seat belt while driving, is enough to make other bribe-hungry police officers wiser.


Two years ago, head constable Satinder Singh had asked a man who was driving without the seatbelt to pay Rs 200 for "settling the matter", instead of imposing a hefty challan of Rs 1,200.

The errant driver turned out to be a sub-inspector.

Singh’s act was caught on camera and he was dismissed from service. Two years after his dismissal, the Delhi High Court on Friday upheld the punishment.

Judges BD Ahmed and VK Jain said, "Disciplinary authority rightly observed that indulgence of a public servant in activities such as demanding and accepting money needs to be dealt with a heavy hand and retention of police officials, indulging in such activities, is undesirable and not warranted in public interest."

"A police official indulging in such corrupt activities should not be allowed to continue in service and needs to be weeded out from the police force," the judges said while dismissing Singh's appeal.

Singh, posted at Aaya Nagar police picket, had stopped a van driven by sub-inspector Sanjay Gupta.

Vigilance branch head constable Ranbir and inspector Raj Singh were also travelling in the vehicle.

Pointing out towards Gupta and Ranbir, who were sitting on the seats front and had not put on seat belts, Singh asked Gupta to show his driving licence and asked them to pay a fine of Rs 1,200.

When Gupta said if the "challan could be avoided", Singh said "the matter could be settled on the payment of Rs 200".

Singh asked them to pay the amount to constable Jagdish who was with him.

Inspector Raj Singh captured the incident on his mobile phone.

Singh’s lawyer told the high court that "while striking a deal with the sub-inspector, Satinder Singh had presumed him to be a common man and not a police officer".