In pics | Sniffing it out: Here’s how Delhi Metro’s security dogs are trained | delhi | Hindustan Times
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In pics | Sniffing it out: Here’s how Delhi Metro’s security dogs are trained

delhi Updated: Oct 14, 2016 14:28 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times
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A CISF team trains the dogs at Shastri Park in New Delhi. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

It’s a furry pack -- the Delhi Metro new recruits.

The Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) has hired 8 dogs for its bomb squad to sniff out explosives and prevent any possible terror attacks at the stations.

The dogs -- -- five Labradors and three German Shepherds -- have been sent for a six-month training at a centre in Indirapuram.

The force plans to add another four dogs in the next six months to its pack.

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But why do they need furry friends to do the job? The DMRC plans to add 107 stations in its Phase III, attracting millions of new passengers. The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) -- which guards Delhi’s metro stations – feels human personnel won’t be enough to provide security for the expanded network.

CISF also employs Golden Retrievers and Cocker Spaniels in their anti-bomb squads.

Here’s a look at man’s best friends learning the tricks:

The reluctant one: “In the middle of training, but first, let me roll over.” (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

(Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

A German Shepherd runs with a CISF trainer. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

(Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

The German Shepherd is good for drug detection and the Labrador is good for search and detection of bombs. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

The CISF’s focus on dogs has increased in recent times with the force purchasing 19 dogs this year for phase III stations. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

Dogs play an important role in bomb detection because their reaction time is faster than humans.. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

These security dogs start their day at 7am and end at 11pm. Each dog works on a four-hour schedule, in which they cover at least five-to-six stations. (Sushil Kumar/HT Photo)

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