Infrastructure charges will add to water bill next year | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Infrastructure charges will add to water bill next year

delhi Updated: Dec 18, 2012 02:34 IST
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Along with the 10% annual hike in water tariff that would be effective from January 1, Delhi Jal Board (DJB) consumers are set to pay more in terms of infrastructure charges for planned colonies and water and sewer development charges for unauthorised-regularised colonies.

From 2013, for a family consuming up to 20 kilolitres (20,000 litres) of water per month, the bill that was around Rs.241.90 per month (billing cycle is bi-monthly) is set to increase to about Rs.260 per month or more depending on the consumption. Similarly, for families consuming 30 kilolitres per month, the bill is set to increase from about R1,075 to approximately R1,200. Most planned colonies in Delhi fall into these two categories with few consuming more than 30 kilolitres per month.

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Following the notification of the Delhi Water and Sewer (Tariff and Metering Regulation), 2012, the DJB will now also be charging consumers for additional sewer generation if they have sources other than the DJB’s, such as tankers and ground water. “The DJB considers 80% of water supplied turns into sewer. However, we levy only 60% of charges of volumetric consumption,” said a senior DJB official.

Most of the consumers in south Delhi colonies with plot/property size 200 sq metres or more — especially those who have bore well connections apart from the DJB’s — will now be charged with infrastructure charges for loading additional burden on the system by excess consumption. The infrastructure charges are Rs.30 per litre.

The policy has already been notified and applicable to all existing and new consumers. “The infrastructure charge has been introduced owing to the increasing demand for water,” said Debashree Mukherjee, the water utility’s CEO.