Join i-Race, compete with runners in US, Oz | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Join i-Race, compete with runners in US, Oz

delhi Updated: Mar 05, 2009 23:47 IST
Snehal Rebello
Snehal Rebello
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

You can be 60 years old and 35th in the race but still win a marathon — beating competitors half your age.

In a first of its kind, the alumni association of Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (IITB) and the IIT Alumni Runners Group is organising i-Race 2009: Fun, Fitness, For All, a racing competition in six cities across the world — that’s Mumbai, Bangalore, Pune, Delhi, Bay Area (California, US) and Melbourne in Australia on March 8.

What’s novel is that unlike other races where the winner is the one who crosses the finishing line first, winners of the i-Race will be judged as per their ability using complex mathematical computations.

“In a race or any competition, people have different abilities in terms of age, sex, height, weight and so on. So if a participant is 11th in the race, the technology will demonstrate performance as per his ability. Not only will he stretch himself as per his ability, performance-wise he could also be better than the one who reaches the finishing line first,” said Madhur Kotharay, the brain behind the event, adding that such a race will be affair conducted thrice every year.

Once the participant completes the race, the time is fed on the computer. “The time is then adjusted as per the
participant’s age, height, body mass index, etc. The uniqueness of the race is that it is independent of each other and the
geographical location,” said Kotharay.

Ranging from distances between 5 km and 10 km, the race, part of the IITB golden jubilee celebrations, is open to IITB faculty, students, alumni and families. There will be a worldwide ranking irrespective of the city where the participant is from.

While a similar race was organised in July using the global positioning system, Bluetooth and GPRS-enabled mobile phones to track runners across the course of the race on a central computer, the system has been discarded this time as