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New courses ‘ill-conceived’, say teachers

delhi Updated: May 20, 2013 02:41 IST
Mallica Joshi
Mallica Joshi
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

Mindless and ill-conceived is how teachers have described the courses formed under the new four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP) at Delhi University.

Teachers who have seen the course material have emphsised how a student who passes out after two years with a diploma will learn nothing of critical thinking and analysis.

One of the biggest allegations that the teachers are making is that the university has asked them to remove references to critical terms such as political economy or any other topics that discuss Left principles.

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“How am I supposed to teach my students about culture and economy without using these references? How will the students develop critical thinking and analysis, which are crucial for them to become journalists?” said a teacher who teaches journalism.

Other teachers have raised objections to the omission of courses without thinking about how it will affect the overall understanding of the subject.

“In the final course, papers that enable students to understand basics of pure mathematics have been removed or placed in the second and third year. These courses need to be taught at the very beginning to make sure that any other course the student does is easy to understand,” said Nandita Narain, who teaches Mathematics at St Stephen’s College.

According to teachers, courses in Number Theory and Discrete Mathematics have been removed from the course.

The teachers are also speaking up against the foundation courses and their content.

“Some courses are too easy while others are very difficult. The paper in mathematics may seem interesting and very basic but anyone who has taught these subjects knows that students will have a problem in understanding it,” said Sanam Khanna, who teaches English in Kamla Nehru College.

Teachers have been demanding that all foundation courses not be made mandatory and that students should be able to choose from a set of different courses so that they can know the basics of a certain subject.

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