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Out of Delhi, for a school

delhi Updated: Nov 02, 2007 02:53 IST
Avishek G Dastidar

Rajat Sinha, working with a multinational company, had to settle for a lesser known school for his three-year-old son who failed to get through to a top-grade central Delhi school. Reason: others had outscored him, going by the Ganguly Committee’s formula of admissions.

Last year, to do away with the system of children being interviewed by schools for nursery admissions, an expert committee headed by CBSE chairman Ashok Ganguly came up with a formula for nursery admissions. According to it, factors like sibling, alumni, neighbourhood, parents’ educational qualification and occupation made for 100 points. Each candidate was weighed against these factors to arrive at a score.

Unwilling to go through the same ordeal this year, Rajat has admitted his son at a Guragon school, which does not come under the ambit of the new rules. Like Rajat, hundreds of parents who either felt hard done by the 100-point formula last year or are unwilling to bear the uncertainty this year have opted for schools in Gurgaon and Noida.

Manika Sharma, Principal of Sri Ram School, Gurgaon, says, “There was a 30 per cent increase in the number of admission forms processed this year, and that includes an increase in the number of Delhi parents applying.”

Agrees Mohina Dar, principal of Amity, Noida. “Parents from areas like Mayur Vihar, Sarita Vihar, Patparganj have applied this year. May be they don't want to sit around indefinitely waiting for Delhi schools to take in their children.” In Amity, out of 5,000 applicants, 10 per cent are from Delhi this year, she says. “The trend started last year when the situation was as confusing in Delhi,” she says.

Lotus Valley, Noida, has received around 1,000 applications for its 250 seats. “About 50 per cent of that is from Delhi parents. This is a recent trend,” said S.C. Arora, vice-chairman, Lotus Valley. The school runs buses to East and South Delhi areas.

Such is the influx that Cambridge School in Noida even had to discourage Delhi parents from applying. "We have limited seats. How can we accommodate so many children from Delhi? So we counselled parents against applying,” said the principal.

To facilitate the Delhi students, Amity, Noida, is even running 25 school buses in East Delhi areas.

Lotus Valley, Noida, has received around 1,000 applications for its 250 seats. “About 50 per cent of that is from Delhi parents. This is a recent trend,” said S.C. Arora, vice-chairman, Lotus Valley. The school runs buses to East and South Delhi areas.

Will NCR gain be Delhi loss?

In Delhi, November 7 has become a landmark date for schools this year when the High Court will deliver directions regarding admissions in the Capital. Usually, this time of the year has always been a busy season for schools and parents, who scramble for prospectus and take part in the preliminary process of admissions. But not this year.

“We haven’t even printed the prospectus yet,” said LV Sehgal, principal of Bal Bharti Public School and secretary of National Progressive Schools Conference, a body of 110 reputed Delhi schools.

Regarding parents opting for the NCR schools, Sehgal feels once schools in Delhi opened admission process, many Delhi parents would withdraw candidature from the NCR schools. But experts disagree.

“Reputed schools will not see withdrawals,” Mohina Dar says.