Quack lands piles patient in ICCU | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Quack lands piles patient in ICCU

delhi Updated: Apr 13, 2009 01:53 IST
Jaya Shroff Bhalla
Jaya Shroff Bhalla
Hindustan Times
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A quack, who claimed to be an expert in treating piles besides fissures and sinus, recently landed a piles patient in the Intensive Critical Care Unit.

Taking immediate action, the Delhi Medical Association has registered a case of cheating against D Biswas with the Delhi Police and the Indian Medical Association (IMA). If he is found guilty, the IMA can seal his clinic and bar him from practice.

Biswas, who claims he is a registered medical practitioner in Laxmi Nagar, charged the 30-year-old salesman of a hardware shop, Sanjay Kumar, Rs 12,500 for a quick-fix surgery. He also promised Kumar free treatment if the disease resurfaced. But Kumar’s condition deteriorated and he developed bedsores and faced trouble walking.

The family then approached doctors in Sanjeevan Hospital, who informed that his condition was critical.

“My brother, who earns Rs 7,000 a month, finds it difficult to support our family. We had already paid Biswas Rs 12, 500, so we let him continue with the treatment,” Dolly Rani, Kumar’s sister, said.

“When I was shown the medical prescriptions signed by Biswas, we found his Delhi Medical Council (DMC) registration number was missing. It is mandatory for a doctor to mention the DMC number,” Dr Anil Bansal, joint secretary, Indian Medical Association, said. “We found the prescriptions suspicious and registered a complaint with the DMC, the police commissioner and Director Health Services, Delhi Government,” he added.

When HT spoke to Biswas, he rubbished all allegations, saying he was not a quack. “I am registered with Ayurved Ratan and my medical registration was done in Patna.” He claims Ayurved Ratan is an ayurvedic council in Bihar.

But Biswas did agree to having prescribed medicines to Kumar. “I know it’s illegal for an Ayurvedic practitioner to give allopathic medicines which are not permitted in our list of 71 drugs. But we do it to prevent septicaemia,” he said.