Race for hostel seats tougher than getting into colleges | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Race for hostel seats tougher than getting into colleges

delhi Updated: Jul 03, 2009 00:06 IST
Tanya Ashreena
Tanya Ashreena
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

So you’ve got into your dream college? Congrats! And best of luck. Now comes the tougher part. Getting the much sought after hostel seat.

As seats are limited, most colleges have only two-three hostel seats per course, which are allocated to students on merit and need basis. However, the seats do not come easy. Before being granted a seat, a student must face the much-dreaded hostel interview.

“When I applied for sociology at Miranda House, I didn’t know my 95 per cent won’t be enough to get a hostel seat,” said Shreya Kumar, a student.

“When I took the hostel interview, initially I was rejected. Faculty members said I had to have a local guardian. When I told them it was my sister, they said that since she was 22 and unmarried she was not allowed to be a local guardian. Imagine trying to arrange a local guardian in an hour!”

To avoid disappointments, college faculty advise students to carefully go through the prospectus and verify what each college requires.

“As each college has its own criteria, a student must go through the individual college’s prospectus. While we may allow brothers or sisters to become local guardians, another college may not. Students often mistake that what is permissible at one college may also be permissible at another,” said Manasvini M Yogi, media advisor, Indraprastha College for Women.

Hindu College principal Dr D N Gupta said though hostels are granted mainly on a merit and need basis, students are interviewed to verify the genuineness of a applicant. “Our interview is more like an interaction. We ask students questions like ‘Why do you need a hostel’ or ‘Have you stayed in a hostel before’,” he said.

Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC) principal P C Jain said: “Though mostly a formality, quite a number of students forget to bring minor things, such as marksheets. It is advisable they check they have everything, as it becomes a problem later.