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Revised courses spell relief for students

delhi Updated: Jul 14, 2008 01:30 IST
Swaha Sahoo
Swaha Sahoo
Hindustan Times
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Students enrolled in the BSc (H) Food Technology and BSc Physical Sciences courses at Delhi University are in for a pleasant surprise. The revised and pruned courses were on Sunday passed by the Academic Council of the university and will be implemented from the current academic session.

“All the subjects in BSc Physical Sciences course including Physics, Chemistry, Math and Life Sciences have been pruned. The course was very heavy and tough. As a result 75 per cent students had flunked the course last year,” said SR Arora, principal, Hans Raj College.

Based on representation by students the University revised the course and difficult topics from various subjects were deleted. “The number of papers remain the same but the difficulty level had been brought down to the standard of a pass course,” Arora said.

The revised course in BSc (H) Food Technology was also passed in the AC meeting. “The course had not been revised since its inception in 1989. We have introduced new elements in food technology like food safety management system, food laws and biotechnology aspects like Genetically Modified food,” said Deepa Joshi, HoD, Food Technology at Shaheed Rajguru College of Applied Sciences. “We have also made Food Engineering and Packaging a separate course so that the papers are simplified,” Joshi said.

The Academic Council also passed the revised Math syllabus, thus doing away with BA/BSc (H) Math and giving it a singular BSc degree. The syllabus will be implemented from the next academic session.

The Council unanimously rejected the UGC’s proposal for grant of selective reemployment to superannuated teachers from 65 to 70 years. “We have no dearth of teachers. In a recent interview for Hindi teachers at Shyam Lal College there were more than 800 candidates,” said Pankaj Garg, AC Member. “If we reemploy older teachers where will the young candidates go?” he asked.