Scam-stung Ramjas ropes in forensics | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Scam-stung Ramjas ropes in forensics

delhi Updated: Jun 26, 2012 11:01 IST
Mallica Joshi
Mallica Joshi
Hindustan Times
Mallica Joshi

Among the officials vetting documents submitted along with admission forms at Ramjas College this year would be forensic experts.

The college administration has taken the step to avoid a repeat of the fake mark sheet scam of last year that brought disrepute to the institution.

The college has roped in four forensic experts to catch forged documents.

"The mark sheets will be scrutinised against all possible forgeries. Any irregularity will be reported to the authorities concerned. We want to make sure that no admission takes place on the basis of forged documents. The college is committed to hold a free and fair admission process," said Rajendra Prasad, principal, Ramjas College.

A scam was unearthed by the college officials last year, involving first year students and non-teaching staff of the college. Close to 35 mark sheets, on the basis of which they took admissions, were found to be fake. This prompted a detailed inquiry by the college authorities as well as the police which revealed that other students, though lesser in number, had also taken admission in Ramjas College using fake mark sheets.

"Two of the forensic experts are retired government officials and the rest are freelancers. They will work with us throughout the admission process to make sure nothing goes wrong," Prasad added.

A large number of students were able to forge their mark sheets as there were no application forms last year. Students were supposed to take admissions directly after the colleges came out with the cut-off list, university officials said.

"Students are supposed to declare th eir marks in the application form. But the removal of the form meant that students would first see the cut-off and then forge their mark sheets to suit the required percentage," said a senior college official.