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The rise of humanities

delhi Updated: Jun 21, 2009 22:46 IST
Ruchi Bhatia
Ruchi Bhatia
Hindustan Times
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Till a month ago, Sumit Handa (17) believed that science students had an edge over those pursuing humanities as far as career options are concerned. But he has now switched to a different school of thought — one that looks up to humanities.

A plethora of professional opportunities available to students choosing this stream led to the change of opinion.

Courses like Political Science, Psychology, History, Sociology, and Philosophy are no longer poor cousins to
science.

“Social sciences are regaining their importance in establishing meaningful relationships amongst different aspects of the society,” said N. Sukumar, lecturer, Department of Political Science, Delhi University.

At DU, the study of subjects such as Political Science has been restructured till the master’s level to ensure holistic development.

“Knowledge of human rights and developmental policies facilitates a student’s entry into organisations such as the United Nations,” added Sukumar.

History, too, doesn’t lag behind as far as working towards a bright professional future is concerned. Apart from conventional choices like Civil Services and Journalism, students of History can now enter into new fields such as Art History, Art Restoration, Heritage Tourism and Psephology.

Interestingly, a degree in Philosophy can pave a way into professions such as Law and Civil Services. Graduation in Psychology, on the other hand, opens doors to a career in clinical Psychology, organisational behaviour and students also get snapped up as counsellors with hospitals and multinational companies at attractive salaries.

“In Philosophy, our idea is not to tell a person what to think, but teach them the logic of thinking. This helps them in making sound and informed opinions, which take you leaps and bounds in professions like Law and Civil Services,” said Devasia M. Anthony, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Hindu College.

“Not only this, higher study in Human Relationship can open doors in new areas like philosophical counselling,” he added. Such lucrative opportunities have obviously busted age-old myths for the young generation. So, Humanities, too, has acquired the serious tag.

“I would prefer studying unconventional subjects as they would open up my horizon and give me an edge over others,” said Srishti Soni, a third year student of History (Hons) from Gargi College.

“I always thought that I was at a loss of opportunities as compared to Science students but I got a job with an NGO right after my graduation,” said Julie Thomas, a student of Sociology at Delhi University.