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HindustanTimes Fri,18 Apr 2014

Vir Sanghvi

Counterpoint: Two nations, two choices

The main reason why India and Pakistan have followed such divergent paths is because of the choices made by them after Independence, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Counterpoint: A Gujarati Perspective

The mistake many of us make in reading the Gujarat victory is that we see Modi through the prism of a single issue, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Two cases, four thoughts

Rather than be concerned about a couple of failed car bombs in a faraway country, let’s think about our own blasts and our system of justice, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Counterpoint: Soft Power Vs Hard Facts

We have never been a nation of hamburger-heads, a people who allow our appreciation of soft power to cloud our rational judgment, writes Vir Sanghvi.

The Bhaiyya Effect

The roots of Raj Thackeray's attack on Bhaiyyas lie in the country's transformation economically. Vir Sanghvi elaborates further...

Setting the record straight

Journalists must be judged by their journalism. Not by tactical conversations with sources that are secretly recorded and then relayed to the public in a doctored form. Vir Sanghvi writes.

The uncrowned king of Mumbai: Bal Thackeray

Even as his peers lost relevance over 4 decades, Bal Thackeray continued to be the uncrowned king of Mumbai, Vir Sanghvi writes.

Onto the next campaign

There are many questions about Modi’s future. In no mood to wait for answers, he’s ready with his battleplan to first conquer the BJP and then India, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Rushing to take offence

The reason for Nitesh Rane’s return to the original Thackeray rhetoric against Gujaratis is that Maharashtra politics is now being divided on ethnic lines across all parties. Vir Sanghvi writes.

Poised for instability

Indian politics is in a state of flux and the post-poll possibilities are endless, and not confined to either Narendra Modi or Rahul Gandhi. Sadly, these options are depressing, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Reap the whirlwind

Rapists must get the death penalty because a society that cannot punish those who damage it ends up punishing itself. Perhaps, their punishment will deter others. Perhaps it won’t, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Modi is filling the vacuum of visible leadership in India

Modi has not changed since 2002. But the present government has provided no evidence of leadership in these tough times. So he has seized the opportunity and filled the gap of visible leadership. Vir Sanghvi writes.
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