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HindustanTimes Mon,22 Dec 2014

Vir Sanghvi

Setting the record straight

Journalists must be judged by their journalism. Not by tactical conversations with sources that are secretly recorded and then relayed to the public in a doctored form. Vir Sanghvi writes.

The uncrowned king of Mumbai: Bal Thackeray

Even as his peers lost relevance over 4 decades, Bal Thackeray continued to be the uncrowned king of Mumbai, Vir Sanghvi writes.

Onto the next campaign

There are many questions about Modi’s future. In no mood to wait for answers, he’s ready with his battleplan to first conquer the BJP and then India, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Rushing to take offence

The reason for Nitesh Rane’s return to the original Thackeray rhetoric against Gujaratis is that Maharashtra politics is now being divided on ethnic lines across all parties. Vir Sanghvi writes.

Poised for instability

Indian politics is in a state of flux and the post-poll possibilities are endless, and not confined to either Narendra Modi or Rahul Gandhi. Sadly, these options are depressing, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Reap the whirlwind

Rapists must get the death penalty because a society that cannot punish those who damage it ends up punishing itself. Perhaps, their punishment will deter others. Perhaps it won’t, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Modi is filling the vacuum of visible leadership in India

Modi has not changed since 2002. But the present government has provided no evidence of leadership in these tough times. So he has seized the opportunity and filled the gap of visible leadership. Vir Sanghvi writes.

Call the Pakistan bluff

Even if we accept Zardari’s claim about non-State actors, there’s still a lot that Pakistan can do to help us. Nor is this unprecedented: it does more every day for the US. Vir Sanghvi elaborates.

Learning lessons from Mangalore

What angers me the most about the Mangalore attack is that the agenda is not really anti-alcohol or about any concern for India’s cultural traditions. It is about controlling women, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Third Front’s a crowd

There are many things wrong with the Third Front but here’s the one that worries me the most: these people have no unifying ideology, they have no vision of India, and in many cases, they don’t even have a sense of India outside of their own states, writes Vir Sanghvi.

President of Atlantis

Despite the global recession and the dip in Dubai’s fortunes, Atlantis is on target and had record April revenues. Alan Leibman, President of Atlantis, attributes some of this to the unique nature of the property. It is three things in one: a luxury resort, a water park and a collection of fine restaurants and night clubs. Vir Sanghvi tells more...

When attacked, we must hit back

All opinion polls suggest that the average Pakistani hates India, loves Osama bin Laden and believes that 9/11 was a Jewish plot to malign global Islam. Worse still, the evidence suggests that if you push the Pakistani masses about their true identity they would pick Muslim over Pakistani. Do you have to be a genius to see that the good neighbour policy has been an utter and complete disaster? Vir Sanghvi examines...

Fortune favours the brave

Rahul has shown us that there is a new aspirational young India out there, looking for new answers and new methods. He reached out to those voters even as the Mayawatis and Amar Singhs were playing their own sleazy games, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Politics of inheritance

Family-dominated politics is a closed shop. Entry is open only to those with the right credentials of birth. Outsiders are banned from entering. And slowly but surely, true democracy is replaced by a kind of feudalism in which the peasants are given the right to choose between various aristocrats. The peasants can never enter the ruling class because the wrong blood flows in their veins, writes Vir Sanghvi.

What is the BJP all about today?

The problem with the BJP and the reason why it gropes for old issues to blow up again and again is that it is a party with no core beliefs. Nobody is really sure what it stands for any longer. Vir Sanghvi examines.
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