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HindustanTimes Wed,30 Jul 2014

Vir Sanghvi

A torturous debate over rights

The argument against torture is one of human rights. Can we bend our conception of human dignity to accommodate the demands of wartime and the fight against terror? Vir Sanghvi examines...

Encounters have our sanction too

Conduct a poll and ask people whether policemen should try and build cases against terrorists, should persuade witnesses to testify and then wait six years for the judgement or whether they should just bump them off and a majority of Indians will prefer execution to prosecution, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Bombay to Mumbai, or else...

Now that the Bombay/ Mumbai controversy has returned to the headlines, thanks to the Maharashtra elections, this may be a good time to examine the whole issue of the naming and renaming of places, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Doing us an ex-presidential favour

The next time somebody tells us that we need to keep the US in good humour because American goodwill will get us a seat at the Security Council, be very sceptical, writes Vir Sanghvi.

And if he wasn’t well-connected?

When it comes to its children, the political class is united. It’s them first. And it is the rest of us afterwards. But I don’t think that any of us will let it be. We recognise what the politicians are up to. They think that if they hold firm, the issue will die down and all of us will find other things to worry about. After all, they managed to get Manu Sharma out of Tihar jail without anyone noticing, writes Vir Sanghvi.

December 6, Ayodhya for dummies

Ayodhya was a symbol of two things: a growing anger among Hindus who felt that Muslims were being pampered by the state and Advani’s vaulting ambition. When the BJP came to power, both factors vanished. Hindus could no longer claim that Muslims were being favoured. And Advani got the power he so desperately craved. Vir Sanghvi examines...

Who killed Kamte?

His colleagues on the Bombay Police Force, according to the searing indictment by the widow of the brave officer killed on 26/11, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Did America keep mum on 26/11?

David Headley was formally charged, allowed to appoint a lawyer and is now entitled to all the protections of the US Constitution: he would be within his rights to tell Indian investigators to take a flying jump. Why would the US treat a 26/11 suspect with such consideration? Vir Sanghvi examines...

Who’ll stand up to this big bully?

It is instructive that at the end of over four decades in existence, all of them with Thackeray as its supreme leader (no other Indian party has been led for so long by a single individual), the Shiv Sena still has no positive agenda or dreams of glory to inspire Maharashtrians. Vir Sanghvi examines...

Take the battle into the enemy’s camp

India’s record on covert operations has been lacklustre. We have preferred to fight terrorism either by relying on intelligence or by heightening security. When it comes to retribution, we prefer to go through legal channels rather than take direct action, writes Vir Sanghvi.

The Hindu Fuehrer, a prisoner of his image

So, here’s my question: why did Modi’s career never take off in the eight years that followed the riots? Why is he still no more than what he was in 2002 — to quote India Today — a ‘hero of hatred’? Part of it, of course, has to do with the riots. Vir Sanghvi examines...

What does America have to hide?

It is not difficult to see why the case of David Headley evokes such strong emotions among Indians. For us, 26/11 is as important as 9/11 is to Americans. The difference is that while the US knows pretty much everything it needs to about 9/11, India is still trying to piece together the details of the conspiracy, writes Vir Sanghvi.

Targeting Sania is a wrong call

The agenda is to subliminally link every Indian Muslim to Pakistan and to question the patriotism of an entire community. It is time to ask: do these nutcases really deserve the kind of television time they are being given? Vir Sanghvi examines.
Sania Mirza unites the bigots!

We have reached the turning point

Sadly, I do not see an alternative. There may be ways of reaching out to the tribals, bypassing the Naxalites. But all that will have to wait. First, the State must reassert the rule of law. Then, it will finish off the Maoists. And only then, will we tackle the serious issue of social justice, writes Vir Sanghvi.
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