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A vision for education - from 2013 to 2030

It’s 2030, and India is now an education powerhouse. Massive reforms undertaken 15 years ago, when a three-tiered education system was set up, have yielded excellent results.

education Updated: Nov 20, 2013 11:12 IST
HT Education Correspondent

It’s 2030, and India is now an education powerhouse. Massive reforms undertaken 15 years ago, when a three-tiered education system was set up, have yielded excellent results. The three-tiered structure comprises elite research universities at the top, comprehensive universities and specialised institutions in the middle and high-quality colleges at the bottom.



A report released recently by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) and Ernst and Young (EY) on Higher Education in India: Vision 2030, looks ahead at a time when India will be a leading global player in education. Why a vision and why 2030? Pramath Sinha, chair - task force on the vision document, and MD of 9.9 Media, said during the launch of the report that instead of focusing on the past and what was wrong with the system, it made sense to plan for the future.

“We should look ahead and be guided by where we want to be,” he said. By 2030, India was expected to be the most populous country, with 1461 million people to China’s 1391 million.

‘Indian UNIVS must figure among top 200’

The Higher Education in India: Vision 2030 released recently says that despite the massive higher education system with over 30 million students enrolled across 45,000 institutions, India’s gross enrolment ratio (GER) lagged behind that of developed countries such as the US, Switzerland, Japan and the UK and developing countries such as China, Brazil, Malaysia and the Philippines.

According to Amitabh Jhingan, partner and national leader – education practice, EY, “In order to realise the goals we envision for 2030, adopting a transformative and innovative approach is critical across all the levers of higher education: from curricula and pedagogy to the use of technology to partnerships, governance and funding. Making rapid progress over the next two decades would require a committed and concerted effort from all stakeholders involved ie academia, industry, and
government.”

A lot needs to be done, despite the government’s increased spends on higher education by 37% from `195.1 billion in 2011 to `267.5 billion in 2013-14. For realising the vision, it was important to adopt a learner-centered paradigm of education, introducing multi-disciplinary, industry-oriented, entrepreneurship, and skill-based courses, and adopting new pedagogical techniques such as blended learning, flipped classroom and experiential learning. Incentivising and facilitating faculty development and exchange programmes; attracting and incentivising best-in-class faculty to conduct research would also help.