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Didn't get admission in DU? Go for other exams

education Updated: Jul 17, 2012 19:53 IST
Hema Rawat

Sanjeev Kathuria was not a disheartened soul when he could not find a college and course of his choice in 2010 among list of colleges recognised by University of Delhi (DU).

“The soaring cut-offs were quite disturbing, but I decided to prepare for entrance exams and next year secured a seat in the course of my choice,” said a second year student in University School of Information Technology (USIT), Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University (GGSIPU). He scored 67% in aggregate in Class 12 results, the marks which he considered were not enough to get entry in DU.

To most of the students dropping a year seems a better option rather than taking admission in any course that their marks can get them.

“The competitive exams provides a level-playing field to all candidates, while the DU cut-offs at times seem unrealistic. I was not anticipating admission in the course and college of my choice in DU, thus, I decided to give a year to preparations of Joint Entrance Exam (JEE),” said Amit Jain, pursuing MTech in Chemical Engineering from IIT, Delhi. He scored 78.4% in aggregate in Class 12 in 2006.

With the rising numbers of students scoring 90 or above in various subjects, the competition is getting stiffer in DU. “This makes under graduation studies an uphill task for scorers like us,” said Tushar Chakarvarty, who scored 71% in aggregate in Class 12 in 2011. He is currently pursuing BTech (Computer Science) from Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology (MAIT) which comes under GGSIPU.

According to Central Board of Secondary Education the number of students who scored between 91-95 in Physics, Chemistry and Biology and Computer Science increased from 15116 in 2011 to 18531 in 2012, 25414 in 2011 to 34021 in 2012 and 11889 in 2011 to 17575 in 2012 respectively.

Those who scored between 96-100 in Chemistry, Biology and Computer Science rose from 2367 (2011) to 4542 (2012), 1708 (2011) to 4174 (2012) and 1764 (2011) to 2657 (2012) respectively.

“I have been experiencing this phase shift in the cut-offs. It is a sad situation for students who could not cross the mark of 90. This way the varsity will not have a heterogeneous crowd and students are forced to look out for another options in such situations. The varsity must create some public-funded institutions that can absorb such students,” said Abha Dev Habib, who teaches Physics in Miranda House, DU.