DU aspirants likely to face fierce competition due to steep cut-offs | education | Hindustan Times
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DU aspirants likely to face fierce competition due to steep cut-offs

If you are a Delhi University aspirant hoping to get a college and course of your choice, you are likely to face fierce competition due to steep cut-offs. Those who have scored exceptionally well can expect qualifying scores to be as high as 100% in some courses.

education Updated: Jun 24, 2015 19:25 IST
Gauri Kohli

If you are a Delhi University aspirant hoping to get a college and course of your choice, you are likely to face fierce competition due to steep cut-offs. Those who have scored exceptionally well can expect qualifying scores to be as high as 100% in some courses.

Experts say that the cut-offs may be higher than last year due to changes introduced in the admission criteria and no stream-wise cut-offs. Another factor that will contribute to this change is the number of applications received by the university this year, which is over three lakh.

In a conventional trend, the cut-offs were highest for commerce students and the lowest for humanities students till last year. “The Central Admission Committee this time decided to do away with additional criteria imposed differently by different colleges (till 2014, if a cut-off range of 97%-99% was declared by a college, it was assumed that subject-wise qualifying scores would be in the range of 99%for commerce and 97% for humanities, with science somewhere in between). So the uniform criteria now being applied by all the colleges are being misconstrued as uniform cut-offs (ie all colleges would have one uniform cut-off for one course). Now every college is free to come out with its own cut-offs,” says Nachiketa Singh, member of the DU Standing Committee on Admissions.

Bagging a seat may be easier for students seeking admission in a subject they have studied in Class 12. For those who have not studied a particular subject in Class 12 and still want to pursue an honours course in that particular subject, the cut-offs are predicted to be higher.



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For instance, if a student has applied for geography (hons) and he has not studied the subject in Class 12 or he does not include it in the best of four, then 2.5% marks will be deducted from his total score.

Colleges too, are preparing for an admission rush. According to Anju Srivastava, officiating principal, Hindu College, “We are likely to see more students vying for one seat this year. The university doing away with minimum eligibility and additional eligibility criteria will also impact the cut-offs.” Courses such as English (hons), BCom (hons) and BCom are among the most popular ones and are likely to have tough competition. Students who have scored over 90% marks are likely to take up all the seats.

Most colleges exercise caution and usually declare an exceptionally high cut-off for the first list. This will be followed this year as well. “Keeping the cut-off low could be risky and pose issues such as over admission which may lead to problems of faculty shortage and infrastructure,” says Srivastava.