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Human values set to make inroads into CBSE syllabus

From the next session, scoring a high percentage in CBSE schools would require not just a thorough knowledge of the subject but also the acumen with which you can knit it with human values.

education Updated: Jun 07, 2012 23:18 IST
HT Correspondent

From the next session, scoring a high percentage in CBSE schools would require not just a thorough knowledge of the subject but also the acumen with which you can knit it with human values.


Consider this — three astronauts are descending from a space station to earth when, suddenly, one of their air tankers bursts. Now, this may seem like a developing question to test the knowledge of a physics student – specifically how much force the astronaut will have to maintain for preventing a direct fall, or how it will affect his body mass – but the actual focus lies elsewhere.

Through this, the student will be 'tested' with regard to the values embedded in him. He will, instead, be quizzed on what the other astronauts should do in such a situation, and how the experience could weave a life-long camaraderie between the three. So, though the subject is fundamentally that of physics, the question would be more on the lines of value education.

This is what the CBSE has up its sleeve for all its subjects from the next session.

At its board meet on Monday, the CBSE decided to change the testing pattern for students from Class 9 to 12, sprinkling a "dose" of value education in various subjects.

"There would be synergising of value education in all subjects from Class 9 to 12. So, instead of just testing the students' knowledge of a particular subject, there would also be questions that would help him imbibe certain values. The broader objective of this new introduction is to make students more sensitive and alert towards human values," an official said.

Including this line of questioning in science, humanities and commerce would help instil the basic values of friendship, honesty and integrity – among others – in students, he added.