Law, education students of Mumbai University in a fix over NOC certificate rule to switch institutes | education | Hindustan Times
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Law, education students of Mumbai University in a fix over NOC certificate rule to switch institutes

The state’s directorate of higher education has included NOC in the list of documents that students of LLB, BEd, MEd, BPEd, and MPEd courses must furnish while applying to a new college.

education Updated: Sep 07, 2017 13:40 IST
Sudents pursuing three and five-year LLB, BEd, MEd, BPEd, and MPEd courses of Mumbai University have to furnish a no-objection certificate while applying to a new college.
Sudents pursuing three and five-year LLB, BEd, MEd, BPEd, and MPEd courses of Mumbai University have to furnish a no-objection certificate while applying to a new college.(HT Photo)

Students pursuing law and teachers’ training programmes in the University of Mumbai (MU) are protesting against a new rule that requires them to get a no objection certificate (NOC) from their college if they want to move to a different institute midway through the course.

In an August 31 circular, the state’s directorate of higher education (DHE) included NOC in the list of documents that the students pursuing three and five-year LLB, BEd, MEd, BPEd, and MPEd courses must furnish while applying to a new college.

Students have complained that their current colleges are refusing to issue an NOC unless they cancel their enrolment. The rule has put students in a fix as they don’t want to take the risk of their current enrolment being cancelled and then being denied admission in another institute.

“If a student wants a transfer, he’ll have to cancel his enrolment and if he doesn’t get admission to any other college he’ll be left in the lurch. This policy has effectively made college transfer impossible,” said Ashutosh Paibhale, a student at Government Law College, Churchgate.

Narayan Rajadhyaksha, principal, New Law College, Matunga, said many colleges were reluctant to issue NOCs because they did not want their seats to remain vacant. “A student cannot be simultaneously enrolled at two institutes. If a college allows its students to apply at another college and they get admitted, their seats will fall vacant. The college won’t be able to offer those to other students, because by that time the admission process would be over. This will deprive them of an opportunity to seek admission even though there are seats available,” he said.

However, an official from the state Common Entrance Test cell said the colleges cannot insist on the cancellation of enrolment to issue the document.

“The NOC simply affirms that a student has cleared all the examinations and has paid all the dues to the college and that the college has no objections if the student wants to leave the institute. As long as a student’s application for transfer is under consideration of DHE’s high power committee and he doesn’t get admitted to a new college, his original enrolment remains intact,” he said.

The official suggested that by refusing NOCs the colleges have to retain the students.

“The colleges must understand that if students want to go to a better institute you cannot stop them,” he said

Students now want the state to do away with the new rules.

“The NOC requirement at the time of application is not only arbitrary but also creates a major hindrance to the only opportunity of the betterment of college, placement, and overall student development,” Government Law College’s Paibhale said.