Mass failure at law faculty again, 45% 1st year students fail at least 1 subject | education$higher-studies | Hindustan Times
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Mass failure at law faculty again, 45% 1st year students fail at least 1 subject

education Updated: Aug 10, 2016 01:56 IST
Shradha Chettri
Shradha Chettri
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
Mass failure

About 45% first-year students at Delhi University’s Law Faculty failed at least one subject out of the total five in the second semester in the academic year 2015-16. (Vipin Kumar/HT file)

About 45% first-year students at Delhi University’s Law Faculty failed at least one subject out of the total five in the second semester in the academic year 2015-16. The results were declared on Monday morning.

Over 100 students failed in five out of the total 10 first-year subjects, making them ‘ex-students’.

The college saw mass failure for the second year in a row. Last year, 60 second-year students failed. They claimed they were marked absent though they attended the exams. The scores of a few of them were revised later.

The Faculty of Law has three centres — Law Centre I (LC I), Campus Law Centre (CLC) and Law Centre II (LC II). CLC usually admits the highest scorers of the entrance test.

At CLC, 294 out of 681 students failed at least one subject this year. At LC I, the figure was 366 out of 787, and 222 out of 476 at LC-II.

Read more: DU’s law faculty awaits bar council approval to begin admissions

Failures in the re-examination category were 40 out of 76 at LC I, 29 out of 56 at LC II and 32 out of 60 at CLC.

Second-year results, declared in the evening, also had many failures. The scores of those who fared well earlier also fell.

Ritika Thakur, who scored above 60% till last year, failed one subject. “I can’t believe I failed International Property Law. This looks like a goof-up by the university. I am going to take action and see how my paper has been evaluated,” said Thakur, now a third-year student at CLC.

Second-year students have to clear at least 15 out of 20 subjects to be promoted to the third year.

There were many ex-students in second-year batch as well, said officials. The results came late and could not be included.

“This could be a university policy to decrease the number of students enrolled,” said CLC student Tarun Narang.

The college will be forced to trim student intake by around 800 this year after an adverse report by the Bar Council of India (BCI) that regulates legal education. “Now we have 10 sections with 80 students each. Making ex-students of 100-150 of us would mean theywill be able to have eight sections with 60 students each,” said Narang.

Faculty of Law dean SC Raina said total failures was likely to be only 15% in a few subjects. However, she was critical of students’ performance. “I have checked the papers and done the result moderation myself. These days, children don’t write anything in the paper. How will they not have back papers,” said Raina. Back paper refers to arrears.