Mobile phones, notes used for cheating in Pakistan school exam | education$high-school | Hindustan Times
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Mobile phones, notes used for cheating in Pakistan school exam

Students writing the school leaving examinations rampantly used mobile phones as well as “notes” to cheat at several centres in Pakistan’s Karachi city, a report said on Wednesday.

education Updated: May 10, 2017 16:34 IST
Students writing the school leaving examinations rampantly used mobile phones as well as “notes” to cheat at several centres in Pakistan’s Karachi city, a report said on Wednesday.
Students writing the school leaving examinations rampantly used mobile phones as well as “notes” to cheat at several centres in Pakistan’s Karachi city, a report said on Wednesday. (Shutterstock)

Students writing the school leaving examinations rampantly used mobile phones as well as “notes” to cheat at several centres in Pakistan’s Karachi city, a report said on Wednesday.

On Tuesday, desperate authorities imposed prohibitory orders to prevent people from gathering at examination centres across Sindh province. This was aimed at preventing strangers from entering the centres and barring everyone from using or taking mobile phones inside the premises.

“Despite a crackdown on WhatsApp groups where solved papers are circulating, they continue to be accessed in certain exam centres,” Geo TV reported.

Sindh chief minister Murad Ali Shah and education minister Jam Mahtab Hussain Dahar visited several exam centres and found smartphones with students and even an invigilator, the channel said.

Cheating in exams is fairly common in countries such as Pakistan, China and India, where lakhs often battle limited seats in prestigious institutions, as well.

After pictures of cheating went viral during the board examinations in India’s Bihar in 2015, the school examination board decided to introduce video recording. According to officials, the board also issued tenders for nine multi-storey examination halls in nine divisions with CCTVs, to conduct various examinations.

Last year, the Chinese government said students could be jailed for up to 7 years if found cheating during the highly competitive university entrance exams in its attempts to crack down on a pervasive problem. A crackdown was also launched to target wireless devices used to cheat and also the problem of substitute exam-sitters.