Varsities get 3 months to decide on autonomy of colleges | education | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jun 29, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Varsities get 3 months to decide on autonomy of colleges

If the university fails to take any decision on the proposal of its college for autonomy within three months , it will be presumed that the university has no objection to the grant of autonomy

education Updated: Dec 24, 2016 20:00 IST
University Grants Comission
The criteria for identifying institutions for grant of autonomy includes academic reputation and previous performance in university examinations and its academic, co-curricular,extension activities.(Istock)

There’s good news from the University Grants Commission (UGC) for colleges affiliated to universities seeking autonomy. In a recent development, UGC has decided that varsities have to decide on the application for autonomous status filed by an affiliated college within three months.

UGC has incorporated a new clause in the XII Plan Guidelines for Autonomous Colleges which highlights this. Universities will also have to formulate a transparent policy for dealing with the proposals submitted by its affiliated colleges for autonomous status.

In case the proposal is rejected by the university, the decision shall be communicated to the college through a ‘speaking order.’

“If the university fails to take any decision on the proposal within three months from the receipt of the proposal, it will be presumed that the university has no objection to the submission of the proposal by the college to the UGC for autonomous status,” state the revised guidelines.

The criteria for identifying institutions for grant of autonomy includes academic reputation and previous performance in university examinations and its academic, co-curricular,extension activities. Academic achievements of the faculty and quality and merit in the selection of students and teachers are also taken into account. For unaided and aided colleges, a minimum 10 years of existence and accreditation by National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) or National Board of Accreditation (NBA). Non-accredited colleges will not be eligible for autonomy.

Human resource development minister Prakash Javadekar has also announced recently that institutions which have a high NAAC grade or fare well on the National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF) will have an advantage in getting autonomy.

According to Professor Surendra Prasad, who is a part of the core committee involved in devising NIRF, and is also chairman, NBA, “Using NIRF rank would be an oversimplified substitute for the diligent processes required for taking complex decisions like autonomy. At best, it could be one of the many indicators to ascertain if an institute is eligible for autonomy.”

Professor DP Singh, director, NAAC, agrees. “Institutions are assessed on quantity (increased access) and quality (relevance and excellence of academic programmes offered). It will help institutions if autonomy is linked to their NAAC assessment.”

UGC grants autonomy to colleges that have received the highest NAAC accreditation in two consecutive cycles and those that adhere to UGC regulations. A college will be provided autonomous status if it obtains a no-objection certificate from the affiliated university.