After dyslexia, Bollywood to focus on mood disorder | entertainment | Hindustan Times
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After dyslexia, Bollywood to focus on mood disorder

entertainment Updated: Feb 24, 2009 16:34 IST
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After Aamir Khan's much feted take on dyslexia in Taare Zameen Par, Bollywood is putting the spotlight on bipolar disorder, a psychological illness that causes extreme mood swings in a person.

Being made by Prawaal Raman, known for his earlier thriller Darna Mana Hain, the film is tentatively titled Happy Teachers Day and will star versatile actor Farooq Shaikh.

"It's a story tracing the relationship between a professor and his student. When I read about bipolar disorder I wanted to make a film about it. Not too much is known about this psychological disorder. And it can go undetected for a lifetime because the mood swings are often taken to be just over-moodiness in an individual," Raman, who has worked with Ram Gopal Varma, told IANS.

The brain disorder causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function. The extreme mood swings can result in damaged relationships, poor job or school performance, and even suicide.

While Farooq Shaikh has been finalised to play the professor, a hunt is on for a suitable actor to play the student. Raman has auditioned a number of actors but is yet to zero in on a suitable face.

On parting ways with mentor Ram Gopal Varma, Raman said: "The other day a producer was trying to instigate me into talking against Mr. Varma. I told him if it wasn't for my tenure at the Factory (Varma's production house) I wouldn't be doing the work that I'm doing right now."

The parting with Varma, however, was far from amicable. Raman was directing a film called Zabardast featuring Nisha Kothari and Karan Nath for Varma when he just upped and left.

"After 10 days of shooting Zabardast I realised it wasn't going anywhere. So I told Mr Varma I didn't want to direct it. And I left...Whatever happens, happens for the best," the filmmaker said.