Farhan shares his Kuala Lumpur experience | entertainment | Hindustan Times
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Farhan shares his Kuala Lumpur experience

I’ve just reached Kuala Lumpur after spending three days on the island of Langkawi. Here to get some prep work done on Don and since this is where the film ended, this is where it will begin.

entertainment Updated: Apr 04, 2010 02:08 IST
Farhan Akhtar

Good morning or in case you’re reading the paper later in the day just replace morning with whatever’s appropriate.

I’ve just reached Kuala Lumpur after spending three days on the island of Langkawi. Here to get some prep work done on Don and since this is where the film ended, this is where it will begin. Seated in the freezing cabin from Langkawi to KL, I noticed that some passengers love to indulge in two things. One is potentially harmful to them, the other to everyone on the flight including them.

Number one: The minute the aircraft wheels are re-united with our planet, people undo their seat belts and even stand up times to reach for their bags while the plane is still moving. Is there a point to this activity? No matter how hard you try to understand it, there is no logical explanation. Where are they going to go? Do they know a short cut to the parking bay and therefore have to rush to the cockpit to instruct the pilot?

No. Is there something in their overhead luggage that self destructs if not removed immediately after touchdown? No. The only use this activity has is that it gives a person the opportunity to rehearse falling without injuring another passenger. A gentlemen I witnessed going straight into the coat closet at the head of the cabin, scored a perfect 10 from most other flyers. I would hope he is happy with his score and will choose not to better it.

Number two: Switching on mobile phones while the poor flight attendants are sounding like scratched records asking everybody not to. Now, there is a theory that these electronic devices don’t actually interfere with communication between the pilot and the control tower but can we wait till this is proven beyond reasonable doubt.

If they do interfere however, can you imagine how troublesome it must be for an airport as busy as the one in Mumbai for instance, that handles approximately 650 flights per day. Not to mention dangerous to other passengers who prefer being cautious rather than hospitalised!

And what do you stand to gain by doing this? Nothing. In most likelihood, you will receive a welcome message from the local network informing you about the roaming rate. Is that really important to know while still on the plane? No. Are you going to get a message telling you the baggage belt number for your luggage?

No. Is it going to remind you not to undo your seat belt and stay put? I wish! I have given up trying to solve this mystery but maybe someone out there has the answer. I look forward to it. Until then, if you could excuse me but I have to take an important call. Relax, I’m in a hotel room.