Fashion brand Jack Wills' ad banned for being too sexy | entertainment | Hindustan Times
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Fashion brand Jack Wills' ad banned for being too sexy

The latest marketing campaign by British fashion brand Jack Wills' has sparked outrage among customers with raunchy ads featuring naked models in highly provocative poses.

entertainment Updated: Apr 08, 2011 16:14 IST

The latest marketing campaign by a British fashion brand has fallen foul of advertising rules after it featured naked models in its clothing catalogue.

Jack Wills, which specialises in expensive casual fashion and whose slogan is 'Fabulously British', had sent the catalogue to thousands of customers, sparking complaints, the Daily Mail reported.

The Advertising Standards Authority said an image of a young woman wearing only a pair of knickers and with her leg draped around a near-naked man was likely to cause harm to teenagers.

It was one of four advertisements inside the brand's 2011 Spring Term Handbook.

The first showed a young woman wearing a short skirt lifted to show her buttocks and the lower section of her knickers.

The second showed a group beginning to undress on a beach. One of the men is removing one of the women's tops. The third showed the group wearing only their underwear.

The fourth advert showed a young man and a young woman embracing and kissing. The man is shirtless and the woman wearing only knickers, with the side of her breast clearly visible.

Jack-WillsThe watchdog received 19 complaints about the latest catalogue, mainly from parents concerned its images and lifestyle were likely to be seen and copied by young teens.

Jack Wills said the brand drew inspiration from the "hedonistic university lifestyle".

It said the marketing is intended "to project a positive, fun and sometimes flirtatious" image it believes was an accurate reflection of student life. It insisted the catalogue was only sent to over-18s.

However, the ASA said the images were likely to be seen by younger teenagers and may well appeal to them, "because they portrayed a lifestyle to which they might aspire".

It said the partial nudity "went beyond what could be described as fun or flirtatious", and "was sufficiently provocative as to present a risk to younger teenagers".

The catalogue was found to breach advertising rules governing harm and offence to children and is banned from being distributed again in its current form.

(PHOTO COURTESY: TELEGRAPH)