How Hollywood studios fare at BO? | entertainment | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Apr 30, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

How Hollywood studios fare at BO?

There were few hits and more flops. We take a look at how Hollywood studios have fared at the desi box office so far.

entertainment Updated: Aug 26, 2011 00:50 IST
Robin Bansal

Hollywood movies in India might be selling faster than hot cakes but close to 20 studio collaboration and distribution deals such as Dum Maaro Dum (2011), Chandni Chowk To China (2009) and Saawariya (2007) have bitten the dust at Indian ticket counters. The studios, however, are undeterred.

“We are proud of every single title that we’ve released here as we are looking at building a family entertainment brand and all our movies are key initiatives in that direction,” says Seshasaye Kanthamraju of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, India that released Roadside Romeo, Zokkomon and sleeper hit Do Dooni Chaar.

“We can’t always win. This is a tough business. This is learning... We’re encouraging all our studios to invest in India with co-productions,” adds Michael Ellis of Motion Pictures Association (Asia-Pacific). Speaking on the same lines, Kercy Daruwala of Sony Pictures India that released Saawariya says, “We are always open to new local projects.”

Trade pundits, too, think it’s the content and not the studio that is to be blamed for duds such as Meerabai Not Out, Saas Bahu Aur Sensex and Dus Tola to name a few more. “It all depends on the film. If films didn’t work, it has to do with the content and not with the studios,” says trade guru Taran Adarsh.

Adds analyst Joginder Tuteja, “Hollywood studios have spent equal time, money and energy on these movies and what has been deserving has worked and others have not.”

Some exceptions
Raaz - The Mystery Continues (2009)
My Name Is Khan (2010)
Atithi Tum Kab Jaoge (2010)
Lahore (2010)
Do Dooni Chaar (2010)
Phas Gaye Re Obama (2010)
Khichdi: The Movie (2010)

Is Your Couch Making You Cough?
Promotional Feature